This Week in Music History - Blog - Q93
February 3, 2020 | by: jolene

This Week in Music History

3 Feb 1959 – 22 year old Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens, aged 17, died in a crash shortly after take-off from Clear Lake, Iowa, the pilot of the single-engined Beechcraft Bonanza plane was also killed. Holly hired the plane after heating problems developed on his tour bus. All three were travelling to Fargo, North Dakota, for the next show on their Winter Dance Party Tour which Holly had set – covering 24 cities in three weeks, to make money after the break-up of his band, The Crickets, last year.

4 Feb 1972 During sessions at Trident Studios, London, England, David Bowie recorded ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide’, ‘Starman’ and ‘Suffragette City’, the last songs recorded for the The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars album

5 Feb 2006 The Rolling Stones played three songs during the half-time show of The Super Bowl in Detroit. After the event, the Stones expressed their displeasure over having Mick Jagger’s microphone turned down during the song “Start Me Up”. The line “you make a dead man come” was cut short and a barnyard reference to “cocks” in the new song “Rough Justice” also disappeared

6 Feb 1982 The J Geils Band started a six week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with ‘Centrefold’, the bands only US No.1. A No.3 hit in the UK. The bands album ‘Freeze- Frame’ started a four-week run at No.1 on the US album chart on the same day.

7 Feb 1969 The Who recorded ‘Pinball Wizard’ at Morgan Studio’s, London, England. The song is one of the band’s most famous live songs, being played at almost every Who concert since its debut live performance on 2 May 1969. The track which featured on their 1969 rock opera album Tommy was released as a single in 1969 and reached No. 4 in the UK charts and No. 19 in the US.

8 Feb 1981 R.E.M. made their first ever-recording sessions at Bombay Studios Smyrna, Georgia. Tracks included ‘Gardening At Night’, ‘Radio Free Europe’ and ‘(Don’t Go Back To) Rockville.’