This Week in Music History - Blog - Q93
March 30, 2020 | by: jolene

This Week in Music History

30 Mar 1957 – Buddy Knox became the first artist in the Rock ‘n’ Roll era to write his own number one hit when ‘Party Doll’ topped the US singles chart. Knox would go on to score four more US Top 40 hits between 1957 and 1961.

 

31 Mar 1949 – RCA Victor introduced the 45rpm single record, which had been in development since 1940. The 7-inch disc was designed to compete with the Long Playing record introduced by Columbia a year earlier. Both formats offered better fidelity and longer playing time than the 78rpm record that was currently in use. Advertisements for new record players boasted that with 45rpm records, the listener could hear up to ten records with speedy, silent, hardly noticeable changes.

 

31 Mar 1967 – Jimi Hendrix set fire to his guitar live on stage for the first time when he was appearing at The Astoria in London, England. It was the first night of a 24-date tour with The Walker Brothers, Cat Stevens and Engelbert Humperdink. The Fender Stratocaster burned on stage by Hendrix sold for £280,000 at a 2008 London auction of rock memorabilia.

 

1 Apr 1966 – The Troggs recorded ‘Wild Thing’ at Regent Sound Studio in London. The song went on to be a No.1 US and No.2 UK hit in June the following year. The track was recorded in one complete take (take two).

 

2 Apr 1999 – The Black Crowes played a concert in Knoxville, Tennessee. Joshua Harmon, a teenager sitting in the second row sued the band a year later for $5,000 claiming significant hearing loss.

 

3 Apr 1964 – Bob Dylan made his first appearance on the UK charts with ‘The Times They Are A-Changin”. Dylan wrote the song as a deliberate attempt to create an anthem of change for the time. In January 1984, a young Steve Jobs recited the second verse of ‘The Times They Are a-Changin” in his opening of the 1984 Apple shareholders meeting, where he famously unveiled the Macintosh computer for the first time.

 

4 Apr 2007 – A Swedish couple ran into trouble with authorities after trying to name their baby Metallica. Michael and Karolina Tomaro went to court with the country’s National Tax Authority about naming their daughter after the rock band. The six-month-old had been baptised Metallica, but tax officials said the name was “inappropriate”. Under Swedish law, both first names and surnames need to win the approval of authorities before they can be used.

 

5 Apr 1979 – Duran Duran made their live debut at The Lecture Theatre, Birmingham Polytechnic. The band have since then achieved 14 singles in the top 10 of the UK Singles Chart and 21 in the Billboard Hot 100, and have sold over 100 million records worldwide.